914 front battery packback battery pack  mid battery packs914 rear side view914 interior914 dash
OwnerCarl
LocationLaguna Beach, California US map
Web/Email email image
Vehicle1973 Porsche 914
Converted Porsche 914 to full electric. Rust free
1973 car fully restored.
MotorHPEVS 2 x AC35 - 144V 3-Phase AC
This is two AC 35 motors assembled into one
motor housing, using 2 controllers (500 A each).
165 horse power. HPEVS makes this. link to the
power graph:

WebPage /> 35x2/144%20volt/imperial/ac-
35X2%20144v%20imperial%20peak%20data.pdf
Drivetrainuses original 5 speed transaxle with extra internal
bracing. Uses larger CV joints, as original
failed. Uses a stage 2 clutch to handle the
torque.
ControllerCurtis
2 controllers, 500 amps each

Curtis 1239-8501 HPEVS Dual AC-35 Brushless
Motor Kit - 144 Volt. Link to where I bought my
motor (and the people that converted it most
recently):

WebPage /> cPath=8&osCsid=136mk7372dcu6005ie4k1la6a6
Batteries90 CALB/Skyenergy 100ah, 3.2Volt, LiFePO4, 3.20 Volt, Lithium Iron Phosphate
28.8 kWh capacity. The batteries are split into 2
packs of 45 so that each pack feeds one controller,
each at about 144 volts average.
System Voltage144 Volts
Charger 5kw
full charge from empty in 6 hours at 220V.
HeaterTwin 1500 watt hair driers
InstrumentationCustom built but original appearance.
Top Speed125 MPH (201 KPH)
Tested to 100mph and would go 125 at 5500 rpm.
However, with low rolling resistance tires which
are not made for that sort of speed, I won't be
doing that and wouldn't do it anyway on public
roads. It's the acceleration I enjoy anyway,
not top speed.
Acceleration5 point something. Probably 5.5. Feels fast
anyway! Has surprising pull up to 5000 rpm.
Redline set at 7200. Would like to test the 0-60
and 1/4 mile accurately at some point.
Range160 Miles (257 Kilometers)
conversion to AC is recent. In normal driving,
I conducted a detailed range test which was
about 40% freeway at 65 to 70mph, and 60% city
with many stop lights. At 140 miles, my battery
gauge indicated zero, but the no-load voltage
was still 3.17 volts.
The batteries can run down to 3.00 volts at no
load, so there should be another 20 to 40 miles
at least without going below 3.00 volts.
Drove 80 miles at 60mph at exactly 50% battery reading,
so about
160 plus 20 = 180 total at that speed. The added 20 is
because
the battery gauge is conservative.
Watt Hours/Mile180 Wh/Mile
28,000 watthours/160 miles = 180

Of course, driven harder, this is a bigger number.
EV Miles
Start:3,000 Miles (4,827 Kilometers)
Current:15,456 Miles (24,868 Kilometers)
Total:12,456 Miles (20,041 Kilometers)
 
    As of 9/17/2016
Seating Capacity2 adults
Curb Weight2,700 Pounds (1,227 Kilograms)
weighed on professional scales on each wheel. Rear
is 1400 and front is 1300. This is 52% rear and 48%
front.
TiresP185/65R15, Michelin Energy Saver Green X
Conversion TimeA lot.
Conversion CostThe motor and controllers alone cost almost 9
grand.
Additional FeaturesBigger brakes (Willwood) to handle the extra weight.
New black leather
interior. Fiber optic line from charger light to a more
visible
location. Targa top still fits in the rear trunk over the
battery pack.

The regeneration is wonderful. It's set at 37% normally,
but when I hit
the clutch, it drops to 13% for smooth shifting (the tach
drops similar
to an Internal Combustion engine). I have a switch on
the dash to turn
the regeneration on and off, which I use a lot.

EV West also installed a sensor on the brake pedal so
that as I press
the brake pedal, regen kicks in even if I have the main
regen turned
off.
I cannot take credit for this conversion. I bought the car
from the
person that originally converted it and it is pristine
throughout.
I'm told that the car was bought in 2006 with 146,000
miles on it and
converted to lead acid electric and driven 3,000 miles.
Then
converted to LiFePO4 between 2009 and 2011 and
driven about 2000
miles. I bought the car summer of 2013 and drove it
3000 miles
without realizing how often the brushes needed to be
changed or the
hassle involved. I almost wore through the brushes.
Furthermore,
the torque of the current DC motor is so high that I
worried about
damaging the transaxle and I longed for regenerative
braking. So I
had the car converted to AC power. Specifically to a
Dual AC-35-144V
motor and twin controllers, which puts out 165 hp and
190 lb-ft of
torque.
It was a big job because the battery pack needed to be
reconfigured
to put out less voltage, EV West (in San Marcos, Ca) did
this for me. They are awesome. I highly recommend
them.

code by jerry