Front1Right1Right2Back1Left1Left2ISO2
OwnerAndrew Nilles
LocationSpirit Lake, Iowa United States map
Vehicle2005 Rally 175
2005 Can-Am Rally 175/200 Bombardier ATV, 4-
wheeler
Motor ME1003 Permanent Magnet DC
Motenergy ME1003 11.5kW motor
Full details on their site,
WebPage
Drivetrain3.5 final gear ratio
#50 single row chain
520 single row chain
ControllerAlltrax SR72400
PMDC controller for 72V system with Peak Amp
mode engaged.
Mode 1: 300A to motor, 200A from batteries
Mode 2: 360A to motor, 360A from batteries
Batteries6 Farm and Fleet BCI groups 29, 51, and 24M, 12.00 Volt, Lead-Acid, Flooded
Local hardware store batteries, two of each BCI
group size. The 29 and 51 sizes are regular
starting batteries, the 24Ms are deep cycle.
System Voltage72 Volts
ChargerBlack & Decker BM3B
Individual 12V 1.2A chargers. Slowly changing
over to Stanley equivalent as the B&D ones quit
working.
Heaternone
DC/DC Converter -
No converter on-board.
Instrumentation0-500mA analog ammeter
0-100V digital voltmeter
Top Speed50 MPH (80 KPH)
Maximum top speed with fairings off, 50.1 mph.
Maximum top speed with fairings on, 46.2 mph.
Maximum top speed ever recorded, 53.7 mph.
Most efficient speed, 22.4 mph.
Donor vehicle's previous top speed (w/o
fairings), 44.8 mph.
AccelerationDonor, 0-500ft in 19 sec.
Converted, 0-500ft in 20 sec.
Range5 Miles ( 8 Kilometers)
This is the farthest distance traveled in one
shot. Driving with more stops and starts and low
(<25 mph) speeds has produced cumulative ranges
of over 6 miles. This is limited by the 51
batteries as they only have ~47AH of capacity.
EV Miles
Current: Miles (0 Kilometers)
 
    As of 2/29/2020
Seating Capacity1 adult
Curb Weight480 Pounds (218 Kilograms)
Estimate only. Note that that is 20 lbs over the
max rated weight of the donor vehicle.
TiresFront, Duro 22 x 10 x 7
Rear, Duro 22 x 10 x 10
Conversion TimeDesign = 2.5 months
Test circuit build = 1.5 months
Frame fabrication = 3.0 months
Power-train fabrication = 3.0 months
Final assembly = 0.5 months
Troubleshooting = 1.5 months
___
Total (with overlap) = 9.0 months
Conversion CostBig three:
$792 Batteries
$650 Motor
$593 Controller
All else + tax:
$1371
Shipping:
$1057
___
Total:
$4463
Additional FeaturesIncludes forward and reverse through switching contactor.
This is a thing I'd been wanting to do for a long time. I designed
the build during the winter after graduating college, and that
time allowed me to build up enough capital to fund the project for
the rest of the year. It was intended to be a commute vehicle, but
it turned into a convenience vehicle with the limited range and
the risk of freezing the batteries. It is quite cold in North
Central USA.

The build was done almost entirely in my garage. I used a local
machinery shop's mill and lathe for some of the pieces of the
frame that really needed the extra accuracy. I sourced as many
parts as were practical from the local hardware store, and almost
all others ($1125) came from Ebay. There was a decent chunk of the
project's budget that went towards special tools for the job, and
hopefully I'll have the chance to use some of those tools in other
projects.

Overall, I am pleased with the conversion. The only things I would
do differently would be in the departments of battery and bearing
choice. I went the cheap route on both of these since I knew it
wouldn't be used for much more than strolling around town. The
batteries are simple SLA starter/marine, but LiFePO4 with a
thermal management system would undeniably be better.
Additionally, better, more expensive bearings would allow better
performance specs and would likely last longer. But again, for the
price and purpose, the current ones will do.

A big thank-you to all those that posted questions, answers, and
explanations on all things electrical on the internet. This
project likely would have costed another $1000 and another year to
get done if it hadn't been for your help. Thanks!

code by jerry